Trump Files 5th Motion For Directed Verdict

By Victor Winston, updated on December 17, 2023

In a significant development, Trump has filed his fifth motion for a directed verdict, a move underscoring the contentious nature of this legal showdown.

The lawsuit, brought forth by the New York Attorney General, accuses Trump, his sons, and executives of the Trump Organization of engaging in a decade-long scheme to fraudulently inflate Trump's net worth.

This was allegedly done to secure more favorable loan terms, a charge that has brought intense scrutiny to Trump's business practices.

Key Rulings and Testimonies Shape the Narrative

Judge Arthur Engoron, presiding over the case, has already delivered a partial summary judgment. He ruled that Trump submitted "fraudulent valuations" for his assets. This ruling forms a crucial element of the case against the former President and his business dealings.

Despite these allegations, Trump and his legal team have maintained their stance of innocence. They argue that the supposed inflated valuations are a result of Trump's exceptional business acumen, not fraudulent intent. The defense's narrative centers on this assertion, aiming to counter the charges leveled by the state.

The state has concluded its presentation after three weeks of testimony, having laid out its case against Trump and his organization. This phase of the trial has been marked by detailed examinations of financial records and testimonies from various experts.

Gag Order and Trump's Response

In a twist to the proceedings, Trump has cited a limited gag order as the reason for his decision not to testify. The judge has emphasized that he will "rigorously" enforce this gag order, limiting comments on the trial to ensure a fair and unbiased process.

An accounting expert, called by the defense, testified that "there is no fraud here," challenging the core of the state's case. This statement offers a stark contrast to the narrative put forward by the prosecution, ABC News reported.

While Trump has distanced himself from the preparation of financial statements, evidence has emerged that banks may have suffered significant losses due to the alleged misrepresentations. The testimony of an expert suggested that these misrepresentations cost banks approximately $168 million.

Financial Complexities and Trump's Legal Maneuvers

Amid these allegations, evidence has come to light showing that Deutsche Bank profited from lending to Trump. This revelation adds another layer to the complex financial dealings under scrutiny.

The defense has also highlighted that Trump's financial statements carried disclaimers, advising lenders to exercise caution. This aspect of the case points to the nuanced nature of financial representations and the responsibilities of lenders.

Trump's recent actions, including the filing of a motion to appeal the gag order to the New York High Court and the pursuit of a directed verdict, underscore the aggressive legal strategy employed by his team. These motions reflect their determination to challenge every aspect of the case.

Looking Ahead: The Trial's Conclusion Draws Near

The trial, which began in December 2022, has seen a series of developments over the past weeks. The state presented its case in early December, followed by the defense presenting theirs later in the month.

Trump's legal team has been active in filing motions, including the recent one for a directed verdict. These legal moves indicate their approach to defending against the charges.

As the trial progresses, with closing arguments scheduled for January 11th, all eyes are on the courtroom. The outcome of this case is awaited with bated breath, not just for its implications on Trump but also for its potential ripple effects on the broader business and political landscapes.

Conclusion: A Trial Marked by Controversy and Complexity

  • Trump and his company were accused of fraudulently inflating net worth for financial gain.
  • Judge rules "fraudulent valuations" submitted by Trump.
  • Trump's defense centers on his business skills, and denies wrongdoing.
  • State concludes case after three weeks; Trump does not testify citing gag order.
  • Defense's accounting expert claims "no fraud."
  • Trump fined for violating gag order; distances from financial statements.
  • Expert testimony suggests banks lost $168M due to misrepresentations.
  • Closing arguments are set for January 11th, with much anticipation.

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About Victor Winston

Victor is a freelance writer and researcher who focuses on national politics, geopolitics, and economics.

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