Over 675,000 Cans Of Baby Formula Recalled

By Victor Winston, updated on January 2, 2024

A major recall has been initiated by Reckitt and Mead Johnson Nutrition, impacting over 675,000 cans of Nutramigen Hypoallergenic baby formula.

The recall, prompted by bacterial contamination concerns, involves two formula sizes designed for infants with cow's milk allergies.

This recall includes 12.6 oz and 19.8 oz cans, identifiable by specific batch codes. The affected products were manufactured at a Mead Johnson facility in Zeeland, Michigan, during June 2023. This decision follows the detection of Cronobacter sakazakii bacteria in some cans during testing in Israel.

Concern for Infant Health Spurs Recall Action

Despite all US tests for these batches returning negative results, the company has opted for a recall out of caution. Cronobacter sakazakii, known for causing severe infections or meningitis in infants, poses a significant health risk.

Earlier in August, the FDA had warned the manufacturer about contamination risks at this Michigan plant. This recent development underscores the ongoing concerns about product safety.

According to the FDA, most, if not all, of the recalled product has likely already been consumed. However, no illnesses related to this recall have been reported so far.

Manufacturer's Commitment to Safety and Responsibility

A Reckitt/Mead Johnson representative commented on the situation, highlighting their immediate action upon learning about the potential contamination. The representative said:

When we were alerted in December to a potential for cross-contamination in product samples outside the U.S., both Reckitt/Mead Johnson and the US FDA tested samples from the batch in question, and all tests came back negative. However, Reckitt/Mead Johnson understands the incredible responsibility we have in providing what is often the sole nutrition for infants, and there can be no short cuts for this vulnerable population – therefore, we chose to recall select batches of Nutramigen out of an abundance of caution.

Reassuring parents, the company asserts the safety of other Nutramigen powder formula batches. They encourage continued use of their products with confidence.

Impact and Precautions for Parents and Caregivers

This recall has drawn attention to the need for strict safety measures in infant food production. Parents and caregivers are advised to check their formula cans against the recalled batch codes and discontinue use if they match.

Though significant, the risk of Cronobacter sakazakii remains isolated to the recalled batches. The company emphasized the rarity of such contamination and its commitment to preventing future occurrences.

As a final statement, the manufacturer remarked, "Based on the limited availability of the remaining stock of this special infant formula, it is believed that much, if not all, of the products recalled in the United States have been consumed."

Conclusion

  • Due to potential bacterial contamination, over 675,000 cans of Nutramigen Hypoallergenic baby formula were recalled.
  • The recall includes two sizes (12.6 oz and 19.8 oz) with specific batch codes, produced in a Michigan plant in June 2023.
  • Cronobacter sakazakii bacteria were detected in some cans during testing in Israel; no illnesses were reported in the US.
  • Reckitt/Mead Johnson responded with a voluntary recall out of an abundance of caution despite negative US test results.
  • The FDA had previously warned the manufacturer about contamination risks at this plant.
  • Most recalled products have likely already been consumed; no illnesses related to this recall were reported.
  • Parents were reassured about the safety of other Nutramigen batches and encouraged them to continue their use.

About Victor Winston

Victor is a freelance writer and researcher who focuses on national politics, geopolitics, and economics.

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